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Child Custody Archives

Requesting an emergency ex parte order for custody in Connecticut

Determining the custody of a child is a delicate matter that involves a lot of consideration between the divorcing parents. The court also must consider several factors regarding what is best for the child before issuing a final order. Sometimes, however, the child may be immediately at risk of psychological or physical harm. It is in such situations that one of the parents could request an emergency ex parte order.

A child's preference in a custody matter

Connecticut parents who are going through a separation or divorce may be surprised to learn that their child is voicing a desire to live with one parent over the other. Custody can be a difficult and emotional aspect of a case, and a judge will take into consideration any preferences the child may have, but the best interests of the child will always take precedence over all else.

How virtual visitation is used in child custody modification

Divorced Connecticut parents may have seen the topic of virtual visitation come up during discussions about child custody modification. The concept of virtual visitation may be new to some parents who may have questions about what it means and its implications for their relationships with their children.

Catering to the best interests of Connecticut children

Whether the child's parents come to their own custody agreement or a family court judge creates a custody agreement, the best interest of the child always comes first. This usually entails anything that will keep the child safe, happy and fulfilled. Ideally, both parents will share in the parenting duties in a manner that will foster a strong relationship with that child.

Making a change in child custody or visitation orders

Parents in Connecticut may sometimes need to makes changes to child custody or visitation orders. In order to do so, it is necessary to return to court. A few criteria must be met that will increase the likelihood that the court will approve a change. The original custody or visitation order must have been made in Connecticut, the change must be in the child's best interests and there must have been a substantial change in circumstances. This change in circumstances means establishing a pattern of behavior in failing to abide by the court order or that the child is in danger. It is not possible to compel a parent to visit a child although the court can change the amount of visitation time.

Child custody decisions in Connecticut

When Connecticut courts are asked to make a custody decision in the event divorcing parents are not able to come to an agreement on their own, they will make their determinations through the lens of what is in the child's best interests. While the court will take into account the wishes of each parent regarding custody, the law provides that the ultimate controlling factor is always what will be best for the child.

Types of child custody in Connecticut

One of the most significant effects when parents go through a divorce can be the change in family dynamics for a child, and child custody decisions by the court are approached from the standard of the best interest of the child. This means that decisions will be based on the facts of a case in order to promote the child's welfare as the most important concern. Parental rights and wishes are considered, but these are weighed in light of a child's needs.

Child custody determinations in Connecticut

As is the case in every state, Connecticut courts have consistently held that in making child custody decisions, the overriding factor is the welfare of the child. That standard is also set forth in the relevant statute that provides that, while the court will consider the wishes, rights and responsibilities of the parents, it must enter an order that is in the child's best interests.

Determining home state in interstate custody cases

In Connecticut, some couples may be facing the challenge of interstate custody arrangements. Knowing how these cases are handled can help parents prepare themselves for court. In many of these cases, jurisdiction plays a large role in how child custody decisions are made, and a number of factors determines jurisdiction.

Indiana Pacers star seeks sole custody of child

Indiana Pacers star, Paul George, is in the middle of a custody case regarding a 2-month-old child he may have fathered with a New York woman. The child's mother had originally sought sole child custody primarily because of George's travel schedule. If a paternity test reveals George is the father of the 2-month-old girl, court documents show he will seek sole custody. He feels shared parental responsibility would not be in the best interests of the child.

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